Doña Ana County Democrats Celebrate African American History Month

The Democratic Party of Doña Ana County is proud to celebrate diversity and to join in the observance of African American History Month.

This year’s theme, The Crisis in Black Education focuses on the crucial role of education in the history of African Americans.  Carter G. Woodson once wrote that “if you teach the Negro that he has accomplished as much good as any other race he will aspire to equality and justice without regard to race.”

This year’s annual theme was selected by the Association for the Study of African American Life & History to bring attention to the failure of our nation to address the need for quality, universal education and the importance of the future of educational opportunities, including quality public education, for African Americans and for all of us.

We also honor the historic role of African Americans in the cause of freedom throughout our shared history up to the present time. We celebrate  the heritage, the achievements, and the ongoing contributions of  African Americans, here in New Mexico, and throughout the United States, during the observance this month, and throughout the year, and without whose historic efforts and sacrifice, in the words of Abraham Lincoln, this nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to equality would not have endured.

We also join in celebrating the diversity of leadership that we, as a nation, as a community organization, and as a political party must embrace, if we are to continue to ensure the future success of this great nation and remain a beacon of freedom to the rest of the world.

Each year, Americans observe African American History Month in February by celebrating the history, cultures and contributions of African American citizens whose forebears came to the Americas from the African Continent.

Conceived by the Harvard-educated historian and teacher Carter G. Woodson as Negro History Week in 1925, the celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. In signing the enabling Act, President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”